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Keeping brain active and healthy the key to preventing Alzheimer's Disease

For Alzheimer's & Brain Awareness Month, a local group is asking people to begin focusing more on their brain health as an important step to the return.

TOLEDO, Ohio — Ohio no longer has COVID-19 health orders in place and life is slowly starting to return to normal.

For Alzheimer's & Brain Awareness Month, a local group is asking people to begin focusing more on their brain health as an important step to the return.

Over the last year, the coronavirus pandemic has been top of mind for many people, but with restrictions lifting, the Alzheimer's Association of Northwest Ohio wants you to starting thinking about your brain health. 

"It's maintaining a good healthy blood pressure, maintain your heart health and your heart health affects your brain health," said Julia Pechlivanos, Executive Director of the Alzheimer's Association of Northwest Ohio.

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According to the Alzheimer's Association, there are six million people in the United States living with the disease and many more suffering from some other form of dementia.

Pechlivanos says Alzheimer's affects more than just the person who has it.

"Each of those individuals has about two unpaid caregivers," said Pechlivanos. "Family members, friends, neighbors. So this isn't just impacting the individuals with dementia. It's also impacting the entire family."

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According to Pechlivanos, it's never too early to start thinking about your brain health.

Some of the best ways to do it include:

  • exercising regularly, 
  • getting enough sleep, 
  • maintaining a healthy diet, 
  • keeping your brain active

"There is also a positive impact on how long someone can live on their own and take care of their daily needs if they are living a healthy lifestyle, regardless of whether they eventually develop dementia,"  she Pechlivanos.

Pechlivanos says they're always getting more information on ways to help people avoid developing dementia or slow the disease progression.

The Alzheimer's Association says not to focus on just one of the factors, a mixture of all of them is the best way to help prevent dementia.

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