City argues traffic camera case in front of Ohio Supreme Court - News, Weather, Sports, Toledo, OH

City argues traffic camera case in front of Ohio Supreme Court

(Source: WTOL) (Source: WTOL)
TOLEDO, OH (WTOL) -

The battle over traffic cameras is coming down to dollars and cents. The City of Toledo arguing its case before the Ohio Supreme Court Tuesday.

The judges states it basically comes down to the city challenging a spending statute or law by the state which isn't the same as challenge to the Home Rule protection in the State's constitution.

Each side had 15 minutes to argue their case.

The State asking the Supreme Court Justices to reverse the ruling of the 6th District Trial Court which blocked the state law that reduced funding to cities using traffic cameras like Toledo.

"Rests on the difference between a direct prohibition on something, a direct prohibition on the city's activity or a funding incentive on the other hand,” Michael Hendershot, representing the State of Ohio said. “And that's how these two laws are distinct."

The city's attorney Joe McNamara says Home Rule does apply in this case and wants the Trial Court’s ruling upheld.

"The Ohio constitution affirmatively gives Home Rule Powers to municipalities,” Joseph McNamara, representing the City of Toledo said.

“Yeah, that's the constitutional question in the first law but that wouldn't be the analysis for a spending provision," the judge said.

One Toledoan says the saga of traffic cameras continues to get more and more confusing but agrees with the city's stance.

"I definitely believe that this is a bad precedent for the state to control what is a municipality as a city decides to do," Julian Mack said.

Mack says though he's not in favor of traffic cameras.

Another Toledoan believes the state is right.

"Red light cameras, I think the state is going to win,” John Toth said. “And I think the city should reimburse people all the way back for what they paid for their tickets. They should give them that money back because I think the state is going to win."

The judges can take up to six weeks to make their ruling.

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