MONROE COUNTY, Mich — Officials from the Michigan Department of Environmental, Great Lakes and Energy (EGLE) say evidence of possible PFAS contamination has been found in the water systems of the city of Monroe and Frenchtown Charter Township.

PFAS stands for Perfuroalkyl and Polyfluoroalkyl substances, which are man-made chemicals used to repel oil and water that can lead to adverse human health effects.

Local officials want to stress to the public that the PFAS levels found are well below the federal health guidelines and that the water is safe to drink.

Lab results of a sample collected from the raw surface water at the intake in Lake Erie found 12 parts per trillion of PFAS in the water. This is below the limit of 70 parts per trillion set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's lifetime health advisory.

According to officials, it is not uncommon to find low levels of PFAS in drinking water; PFAS are used in thousands of applications including firefighter foam, stain repellants, non-stick cookware and food wrappers.

Residents who are concerned about the findings can contact the Frenchtown Water Department at 734-289-1015 or the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services at 1-800-648-6942. 

Full regional test results can also be found on the Michigan PFAS Action Response Team website.