EcoTrack 11: St. John's hoop house feeds the hungry - News, Weather, Sports, Toledo, OH

EcoTrack 11: St. John's hoop house feeds the hungry

At St. John's Jesuit in Toledo, Jerry Barker began a group called Feed the Hungry. Their plans are to battle the issue of hunger with an ecofriendly approach by using a hoop house. At St. John's Jesuit in Toledo, Jerry Barker began a group called Feed the Hungry. Their plans are to battle the issue of hunger with an ecofriendly approach by using a hoop house.
"There is hardly any energy input, which not only helps out with the economics of this, but also the impact on the environment," says Vice President Will Butler. "There is hardly any energy input, which not only helps out with the economics of this, but also the impact on the environment," says Vice President Will Butler.

Report by Chris Vickers - email | bio

Posted by LS

TOLEDO (WTOL) - Two of the top issues in the economy for many are energy and food prices.

Some students at a local high school have begun an organization to address both issues.

At St. John's Jesuit in Toledo, Jerry Barker began a group called Feed the Hungry. Their plans are to battle the issue of hunger with an ecofriendly approach by using a hoop house.

What is a hoop house? Barker, who is president of Feed the Hungry, explains. "Well, the hoop house is basically a greenhouse that can be harvested year-round without using heat. What you do is build the regular structure of a greenhouse and then inside you put another cover over it that maintains the heat inside of the greenhouse."

This is important, considering we face tough environmental issues and difficult economic times.

Will Butler is vice president. "There is hardly any energy input, which not only helps out with the economics of this, but also the impact on the environment. There is almost no emissions when compared with other methods of doing the same thing."

Inside the hoop house, no fossil fuels are used to heat it. It uses an extra layer of plastic and that means you can grow these vegetables all year around.

All the food grown gets donated to local food banks, and it's all done with little energy consumption.

"We have a number of greenhouse growers that are struggling because energy costs are so high. We are constantly hearing some of these issues and challenges and so we decided 'Let's look into other alternative practices for growing produce,'" says Rebecca Singer with the Center for Innovative Food Technology

The food is all organic, so it also helps with the issue of nutrition. Though, the idea goes well beyond this. "The ultimate goal is, we want to set an example for other organizations in Toledo and surrounding areas to follow," Barker tells us.

Powered by Frankly