EcoTrack 11: BG wind farm celebrates milestone - News, Weather, Sports, Toledo, OH

EcoTrack 11: BG wind farm celebrates milestone

Typically wind farms are found out west. For years many people believed you couldn't have one in Ohio, but the wind farm in Bowling Green is turning many people into believers. Typically wind farms are found out west. For years many people believed you couldn't have one in Ohio, but the wind farm in Bowling Green is turning many people into believers.

BOWLING GREEN -- The state's first commercial wind farm is preparing to hit a major milestone.

Jennifer Boresz is back from Wood County and has this EcoTrack 11 story.

Typically wind farms are found out west. For years many people believed you couldn't have one in Ohio, but the wind farm in Bowling Green is turning many people into believers.

"The hubs are 260 feet in the air. The blade tips, when they're at the high point of their arc, are about 400 feet in the air," says Kent Carson.

They've been rotating non-stop since energy production began back in 2003 and very soon they will pass the 60,000 megawatt-hour.

Kent Carson, a spokesperson with Amp-Ohio, says that is a huge accomplishment.

"I think what it means is wind works in Ohio and it is a resource that can be developed to be a part of a portfolio of electric generation sources."

Although wind generation can be unpredictable, ranging from full capacity to just 25 percent in a matter of hours. Carson says there are many advantages.

"There's no emissions. The power is generated from the energy of the wind blowing. This is a windy part of the state, so that's a major advantage."

According to Carson, the success of this project is already leading to other alternative energy opportunities in Bowling Green and Sandusky County.

"We are developing additional wind generation wind resources...our goal is over the next few years is we add up to a couple hundred mega-watts of additional wind."

In the meantime, he is encouraging everyone to do their part to conserve energy on their own by replacing conventional light bulbs with compact fluorescent bulbs.

"They use somewhere in the neighborhood of 70 percent less energy with the same amount of light."

And that will result in less energy wasted and more to go around.


Jennifer Boresz reported this story on News 11.


Posted by N Dutton

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