UT students have ss# and grades sent out in email

UT student Kyle Hurst said, "You hear about it all the time and never thinks it's going to happen."
UT student Kyle Hurst said, "You hear about it all the time and never thinks it's going to happen."
The letter from UT states: "We have no reason to believe that there was any ill intent or improper use of the information."
The letter from UT states: "We have no reason to believe that there was any ill intent or improper use of the information."

TOLEDO -- A nursing student at the University of Toledo had his identity exposed. Now he wants to be protected.

He's one of more than 100 students who had their personal information released. He says he's not getting any cooperation from the school, so he's turning to Problem Solver Mika Highsmith in this Call 11 for Action Report.

Kyle Hurst is a senior about to rap up a nursing program at UT. So no doubt, he's anxious. "We were waiting for our schedules. It was supposed to come via email from his dean last week, which it did. But here's the problem.

Hurst explains, "The email had students' grades and social security numbers on it." Private information no one wants circulating through more than a hundred inboxes. Hurst said, "You hear about it all the time and never thinks it's going to happen.

Here's what's even more surprising. "All they did is send us a letter that said basically they're sorry. They think it ok that they haven't done anything," Hurst says.

The letter states: "We have no reason to believe that there was any ill intent or improper use of the information." It goes on to inform students that many of the emails were retracted before they were even opened. That's not good enough for Hurst. "180 students got 180 students' information. Who knows? All it takes is one. People can steal your identity."

A gamble he's not willing to take. "I think they should give us credit monitoring service. So if someone does something, we'll know about it. It won't be a surprise."

Problem Solver Highsmith spoke to UT officials and guess what...unfortunately, they've turned down that request for credit monitoring. They're urging students to check their credit reports and notify them if they see a problem. Hurst's concern is, at that point, it's too late.

Posted by LS