Super-strain staph infections in kids

Microscopic image of the staph bacteria provided by the CDC.
Microscopic image of the staph bacteria provided by the CDC.
Phoebe Little (left) was recently hospitalized for a week with staph infection.
Phoebe Little (left) was recently hospitalized for a week with staph infection.

A high school in Virginia shut down and disinfected from top to bottom after 17 year-old Ashton Bonds died Monday from what appears to be a super strain of staph bacteria called MRSA, or mersa.

Veronica Bonds, Ashton's mother said, "He put up a fight. He was strong, he was strong. I think he was tired too, he was tired."

Since that teenagers death at least eight states are now reporting multiple infections of mersa among students. The anti-biotic resistant bacteria is popping up across the country with deadly results. Dr. John a. Jernigan, infectious diseases specialist, said, "We at the CDC are very concerned about these infections. We are talking about 90,000 infections every year in the U.S. And of those, almost 19,000 are associated with death.

MRSA has been around since the 1960s, usually found only in health care settings or nursing homes. Now, more than ever, patients coming into emergency rooms often have it, so do inmates, the military and athletes.

Six high school football players in North Carolina were recently treated for the infection. So was Phoebe Little whose symptoms started with a fever. "I stayed in the hospital for a week," she said.

Grace Rock, Phoebe's mom said, "She had shortness of breath, her heart was racing, they didn't know what in the world was happening." The drug resistant strains are hard to identify and can turn minor cuts and sores into serious infections.

Doctors advise basic hygiene and not to share personal items like towels or razors.

Posted by LS

CBS contributed to this report.