Russian: First killing was like 'first love' - News, Weather, Sports, Toledo, OH

Russian: First killing was like 'first love'

Alexander Pichushkin, who is accused of killing dozens of people, behind the glass of a security cage during the first day of his trial in Moscow on Sept. 13. Alexander Pichushkin, who is accused of killing dozens of people, behind the glass of a security cage during the first day of his trial in Moscow on Sept. 13.

MOSCOW (AP) -- A man accused of killing dozens of people and keeping count of them on a chessboard reveled in the memory of his first murder at his trial Tuesday, saying "it's like first love. It's unforgettable," news reports said.

Alexander Pichushkin also insisted that prosecutors charge him with all the murders he has taken credit for, saying to do otherwise would be unfair, RIA-Novosti and Interfax reported.

Pichushkin, who went on trial last month in one of Russia's most gruesome serial killing sprees, has confessed to murdering 63 people, with the goal of marking all 64 squares on the chessboard. Prosecutors charged him with 49 murders, most of them committed earlier this decade over the course of five years in Bittsa Park, a sprawling wild green area on the southern edge of Moscow.

The killings terrorized the capital and Russian media dubbed him the "Bittsa Maniac."

Experts at Russia's main psychiatric clinic have found that Pichushkin is sane.

In testimony at Moscow City Court, he recounted the details of his killings and reveled in the memory of his first killing, committed in 1992, long before the start of the murders that he is now charged with.

"This first murder, it's like first love. It's unforgettable," he was quoted by RIA-Novosti as saying.

He said in an earlier televised confession that he had killed his first victim, a classmate, in 1992 when he was 18. Police had questioned him then, but no charges were filed.

Prosecutors have focused on the series of killings in Bittsa Park in 2001, although he claims to have killed several people years earlier. Most of the victims were men, whom Pichushkin had lured to the park with the promise of a drink of vodka to mourn the death of his "beloved" dog.

Pichushkin killed 11 people in 2001, including six in one month, prosecutors said. He killed about 40 of his first victims by throwing them into a sewage pit, and in a few cases strangled or hit them in the head.

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The Associated Press and CBS News contributed to this report.

 
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