Sharing Her Grief, 2 Years After Katrina's Devastating Trounce - Toledo News Now, News, Weather, Sports, Toledo, OH

Sharing Her Grief, 2 Years After Katrina's Devastating Trounce

Lisa Dauro talked with News 11's Shelley Brown about how Katrina has changed her life. Lisa Dauro talked with News 11's Shelley Brown about how Katrina has changed her life.
Lisa's daughter and son-in-law have relocated to Maumee. Lisa's daughter and son-in-law have relocated to Maumee.
This poem is posted at the former site of Lisa's home, devastated by Hurricane Katrina. This poem is posted at the former site of Lisa's home, devastated by Hurricane Katrina.

Two years after Hurricane Katrina devastated the area, there remain plenty of questions about the future of New Orleans and the Mississippi Gulf Coast.

And plenty of heartbreak from which to heal, as one Walbridge, Ohio, native knows all too well.

News 11's Shelley Brown talked with Lisa Dauro on Tuesday. Dauro attended the University of Toledo and later moved to Gulfport, Mississippi where she had a home -- right on the beach.

She raised a family in that home and worked at a good job, she says, until Katrina hit. Now, two years later, she's still feeling the pain that's changed her life forever.

Dauro is enjoying visiting her grandchildren, daughter and son-in-law who are settling into a new home in Maumee after losing just about everything in Hurricane Katrina.

"You know, trying to get readjusted to the area, to jobs, to new kids to everything," says Matt Hawkins, hinting at the difficulty inherent in the task.

And his mother-in-law acknowledges that two years later, she is still healing from the effects of Katrina.

"You know when you're 48, and my husband is 51, there's a big difference in bouncing back," Dauro says.

A poem posted on the property of her former home in Gulfport reads: "Together we will rebuild." But two years later, "nothing has changed," Dauro laments.

"It feels longer. Because I think I'm so not grounded, and I don't feel like I belong somewhere," Dauro says.

The casino where Dauro worked had good benefits. She had hoped to move up into management. Today, it's difficult finding a good job.

Dauro -- like many Katrina survivors -- is in a sort of limbo. She doesn't have a job, "home" is no longer "home," and her future is full of questions.

"I guess in the back of my mind I'm hoping that I can make enough money wherever we are to save enough money to be able to get back there one day and build on our piece of property," Dauro says, with the hope and optimism of a true survivor.

Posted by KO 

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