More than a roadside marker: Families honor lives of loved ones - News, Weather, Sports, Toledo, OH

More than a roadside marker: Families honor lives of loved ones

(Jeni said these markers can remind those passing by about the meaning behind why the sites exist.) (Jeni said these markers can remind those passing by about the meaning behind why the sites exist.)
TOLEDO, OH (WTOL) -

While driving around Toledo, you may notice some items off to the side of the road.

These are markers to remember the lives of loved ones who died from vehicular related incidents.

Lakneisha White was seven years old when her and her cousin Tiffina were both struck by the same car. Lakneisha's father, Jeffery White,  can still recall the incident.

It was Easter Sunday of 1999.

“Her older cousin was two blocks down the street. She was hit and killed by the same car. The two were holding hands just like we taught them to do. I did CPR on my daughter in the street. That was the beginning of a life-changing sequence for me,"  said Jeffery.

He said he thinks about his daughter every day.

“There’s not a day that don’t go by that I don’t just...I crave to touch her. I crave to hold her. I crave to hear her voice one more time. It’s been 19 years since then and it’s just as important to me as the day that it was that it happened," he said.

The Black Firefighter's Association bought the monument that honors his daughter and niece. Jeffery said the monument has been very helpful for his family and his kids. They find peace through it. 

Betty Karibian remembers her son Lucas throughout the year. The license plate “GLOAT” from his show car graces the site.

Karibian said it's an acronym that stands for “Greatest Lucas of All Time.”

"Because there’d be nobody like him,” she explained. “I change it up, like holidays, this is for the Fourth (of July) and for his birthday, or summertime. Christmas, Christmas I put Christmas stuff out here...All the holidays.”

These efforts are not without the help of family and friends who help keep the sites the best they can be.

Jeni Gerber lost her daughter, Kaitlyn Gerber, to domestic violence. 

Jeni said these markers can remind those passing by about the meaning behind why the sites exist.

“They represent someone, someone’s love. So that our loved ones aren’t forgotten," said Jeni. 

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