Proposed Sylvania school levy passes, residents concerned day pr - News, Weather, Sports, Toledo, OH

Proposed Sylvania school levy passes, residents concerned day prior

(A final decision on whether or not the levy will be on the November ballot will be voted on Thursday. If it does pass, it'll go into play this January.) (A final decision on whether or not the levy will be on the November ballot will be voted on Thursday. If it does pass, it'll go into play this January.)
SYLVANIA, OH (WTOL) -

The Sylvania School levy passed to be on the ballot this November Thursday evening; four yes's to one no. 


The school year kicks off in just a few weeks.

Wednesday night, Sylvania Schools looked to members of the community to get their input on school safety and a potential levy on the November ballot.

"Obviously safety and security is a top priority in every school district. Definitely here in Sylvania," said Dr Adam Fineski, superintendent of Sylvania Schools.

But some had concerns.

'We don't need school resource officers for the junior high," said Dave Mullins. "This isn't other districts. This is Sylvania."

Another attendee said he thinks investing in surveillance is a waste of time and money.

"We've already seen, in the case of Parkland and Las Vegas, that video surveillance systems do not work," said Brian Nelson. "They are not effective. This is just another way to ask for millions of dollars. They've already got millions of dollars from us."

Other concerns that were brought up were levy's in the past people are still paying for.

"We already have 17 line items in our taxes for the school as it is" said Nelson. "This is an ask for an 18th levy. Another point nine mills that we just increased point nine mills last year."

But Dr Fineske said funds from previous levies is already going towards things like new technology, lower class sizes, new curriculum material and hiring more teachers.

"If we able to not use those funds for those things-we wouldn't be able to achieve this," he said.

So where would some rather see money from and go towards instead?

"Well, it should come out of this levy we just passed," said Mullins.

"Security is a great thing. We need it," said Nelson. "I have two children in this school system. But I would like to see non lethal security like tazers that cant be taken away. They cant be used against the teacher in a deadly manner."

A final decision on whether or not the levy will be on the November ballot will be voted on Thursday. If it does pass, it'll go into play this January.

If passed, the levy will cost $5 a month for most homes, a total of around $60 a year.

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