Dozens of migrant families from Central America wait for asylum - News, Weather, Sports, Toledo, OH

Dozens of migrant families from Central America wait for asylum at US border with Mexico

The families who spoke to CBS 5 Investigates were from Guatemala and Honduras. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The families who spoke to CBS 5 Investigates were from Guatemala and Honduras. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
A meal kitchen serves migrants and refugees in Nogales, Sonora, through an organization called the Kino Border Initiative. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) A meal kitchen serves migrants and refugees in Nogales, Sonora, through an organization called the Kino Border Initiative. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
There are at least 2,300 children in the United States, who were separated from their parents during the Trump Administration's zero-tolerance border crackdown, which ended this week. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) There are at least 2,300 children in the United States, who were separated from their parents during the Trump Administration's zero-tolerance border crackdown, which ended this week. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
NOGALES, MEXICO (3TV/CBS 5) -

A little more than 100 migrants, including women and children, are waiting to file asylum claims at the U.S. Port of Entry in Nogales, some of them camping on the sidewalk next to the port.

"They want to present themselves, but Customs has been really slow to receive them, which has been a problem because it leaves them really vulnerable here," said Father Sean Carroll, a Catholic priest who runs a meal kitchen for migrants and refugees in Nogales, Sonora, through an organization called the Kino Border Initiative.

[RELATED: Phoenix-area immigration advocates not on board with Trump's executive order]

The kitchen serves meals and arranges for social services for migrants who are heading north, as well as newly-deported people who have been expelled from the United States.

[RELATED: Arizonans protest outside Southwest Key shelter in Glendale holding immigrant children]

In the past month, Carroll has encountered two adults who were deported without their children, who were still in detention in the United States, after trying to enter the country illegally.

[RELATED: Tucson migrant youth shelter scrutinized under 'zero tolerance' policy]

"We know that many parents are in that situation and they're suffering beyond words," said Carroll.

There are at least 2,300 children in the United States, who were separated from their parents during the Trump Administration's zero-tolerance border crackdown, which ended this week.

[READ MORE: Authorities abandon 'zero-tolerance' for immigrant families]

During the two months or so that the crackdown was in effect, migrants who were caught crossing illegally into the United States for the first time were prosecuted and separated from their children. Entering the U.S. at an unapproved location or time is a misdemeanor.

The families who spoke to CBS 5 Investigates were from Guatemala and Honduras. They had small children and were aware of the dangers of crossing into the United States through the desert.

[RELATED: Arizona representative says there is no resolution over immigration crisis]

All said they wanted to enter the country legally, through the asylum process. They said their home countries were more dangerous than the desert or border towns they had encountered so far.

Copyright 2018 KPHO/KTVK (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.

Morgan  LoewMorgan Loew is an investigative reporter at CBS 5 News. His career has taken him to every corner of the state, lots of corners in the United States, and some far-flung corners of the globe.

Click to learn more about Morgan .

Morgan Loew
CBS 5 Investigates

Morgan’s past assignments include covering the invasion of Iraq, human smuggling in Mexico, vigilantes on the border and Sheriff Joe Arpaio in Maricopa County. His reports have appeared or been featured on CBS News, CNN, NBC News, MSNBC and NPR.

Morgan’s peers have recognized his work with 11 Rocky Mountain Emmy Awards, two regional Edward R. Murrow Awards for investigative reporting, an SPJ First Amendment Award, and a commendation from the Humane Society of the United States. In October 2016, Morgan was inducted into the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Silver Circle in recognition of 25 years of contribution to the television industry in Arizona.

Morgan is graduate of the University of Arizona journalism school and Concord Law School at Purdue University Global. He is the president of the Arizona First Amendment Coalition and teaches media law and TV news reporting at ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

When he’s not out looking for the next big news story, Morgan enjoys hiking, camping, cheering for the Arizona Wildcats and spending time with his family at their southern Arizona ranch.

Hide bio

Powered by Frankly