Inmates flood Kentucky police chief's office with sewage - News, Weather, Sports, Toledo, OH

Inmates flood Kentucky police chief's office with sewage

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) - Inmates housed in an aging lockup flooded a Kentucky police chief's office with sewage by flushing jumpsuits and shredded bedding down the toilets.

A week after the wastewater overflow, more repairs are needed before Louisville Metro Chief Steve Conrad can use his office again. Police spokeswoman Jessie Halladay tells news outlets he's using another workspace in the meantime.

The June 5 flooding was revealed during a Metro Council budget hearing Monday.

The inmates were in a 1950s-era lockup above police headquarters that was initially closed a decade ago because it didn't meet safety standards. But more recently, jail officials moved in about 35 security prisoners because the main jail is overcrowded. Those inmates have since been moved and replaced with other minimum security inmates.

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