Fart-filled study reveals how to overcome embarrassment - News, Weather, Sports, Toledo, OH

Fart-filled study reveals how to overcome embarrassment

When you do something embarrassing, thinking about how you would react if you saw someone else in the same situation might reduce your shame, researchers say. (Source: Ben Dalton/Flickr) When you do something embarrassing, thinking about how you would react if you saw someone else in the same situation might reduce your shame, researchers say. (Source: Ben Dalton/Flickr)

(RNN) –  According to researchers, people who experience embarrassment easily in situations such as farting in public may be able to overcome the feeling by thinking about how they would feel if they saw the same thing happen to someone else.

In a study published March 27 for the journal “Motivation and Emotion,” researchers asked nearly 200 participants to examine an ad for gas-prevention product Beano that showed a woman accidentally farting in yoga class.

Participants then answered questions intended to gauge their embarrassment. Those with high public self-consciousness, who researchers said appear to be more concerned with how they are regarded by others, were more likely to envision themselves in the embarrassing situation.

Imagining themselves in the situation increased these participants’ own embarrassment and personal distress.

But in a related study, 220 participants who viewed an ad for Beano in which a man farted in front of his crush were asked to first think about what the people who witnessed the embarrassing incident would say.

“Put yourself in their shoes … would you giggle? Would you be horrified? Would you stare?” the question read.

When participants with high public self-consciousness read this, they thought about themselves less, which reduced their personal distress related to the situation.

In addition, researchers said outside observers are “consistently kinder" than expected when viewing embarrassing situations. Often, they don’t even notice embarrassing blunders, but when they do, they are “generally forgiving."

One of the reasons for this, the study stated, is likely because observers are not personally threatened by the scenario and feel sympathetic to those that are.

Therefore, if people with high public self-consciousness can view the situation as an observer would, it could help them distance themselves from the embarrassment and realize that others will likely not judge them negatively.

Unfortunately, according to Live Science, most people have a hard time thinking this way, particularly when distressed, and it could take “diligent mental training" to fully overcome embarrassment.

But while it might be difficult to change your thinking, it’s not impossible. Maybe, eventually, you’ll even learn to embrace your farts.

Copyright 2018 Raycom News Network. All rights reserved.

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