Rally in Maumee protests against "white supremacist terrorism" - Toledo News Now, News, Weather, Sports, Toledo, OH

Rally in Maumee protests against "white supremacist terrorism"

(Source: Beth Powder) (Source: Beth Powder)
MAUMEE, OH (WTOL) -

A rally to protest against what a group in Maumee calls "white supremacist terrorism" lasted well beyond the planned end time of 8 p.m. Monday night. 

The march started at the Maumee Public Library and ended at St. Paul's Lutheran Church, where people spoke on Charlottesville and other national events in an open-mic style.

The event organizers asked attendees who are white allies to provide a human barrier for people of other and other marginalized people in order to allow them to voice their concerns and opinions. 

Marchers said they felt like they needed to get out of their house and come together, to show just how upset they are about what they saw unfold in Charlottesville, and that they will not tolerate hate in their community.

"Watching on the weekend I got sick to my stomach, like i said because I've been through this once before and this is so unnecessary," said Michael Bates, a Vietnam Veteran.

Bates, who is from Toledo, brought his granddaughter, wife and mother with him to the event. His mom is familiar with events of this nature because is the one who took him to see Martin Luther King Junior during the civil rights movement

"You have to do it from your heart. If you are out here just carrying a sign that's not gonna get it. you have to participate in volunteer work, social work," adds Bates. 

People of different ages and nationalities showed up with signs with messages that read "love wins," "love unites," and "end racism."

"I think it's really important for us to meet in real life while all of this is going on online. Because that kind of disconnect allows for this hatred to grow," said Beth Powder, an organizer for the rally.

Sharing the megaphone with anyone who wanted to speak, participants quoted the words of Martin Luther King Junior, while some shared their own stories of discrimination.

"I think a lot of other races think that there's not a lot of white people that really care," said Michael Flamez. "Being a white person, we need to address other white people to try to address some of this madness."

This rally followed on the heels of a similar rally held in Bowling Green on Sunday.

"My thoughts and prayers are with those injured and affected by the attack in Charlottesville over the weekend," said State Representative Michael Sheehy, who supported the rally. "We must face the hard truth that racial tensions in America still require significant time and effort to heal. I plan to join Toledo-area residents this evening for a march of solidarity to convey our community's feelings toward those involved in the heinous actions in Charlottesville. All are welcome to participate and reflect on Saturday's events in hopes that we can move forward together without hatred and violence."

The event organizers asked attendees who are white allies to provide a human barrier for people of other and other marginalized people in order to allow them to voice their concerns and opinions. 

The purpose of the event is meant was to provide some relief to the community as well as to "express their growing concerns about the increasing death toll of activists and organizers who "demand that people of color have the right to exist."

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