Company designs device to crack down on opioid overdoses - Toledo News Now, News, Weather, Sports, Toledo, OH

Company designs device to crack down on opioid overdoses

One local company has developed a drug-free solution that could help those battling addiction. (Source: WOIO) One local company has developed a drug-free solution that could help those battling addiction. (Source: WOIO)
HIGHLAND HILLS, OH (WOIO) -

Opioid overdoses continue to rise all over the nation. One local company has developed a drug-free solution that could help those battling addiction.

SPR Therapeutics is releasing a device called SPRINT.

"This is the SPRINT peripheral nerve stimulation system," Maria Bennett, CEO & Founder of SPR Therapeutics said.

It's small in size but scientists believe this device could save lives.

"It's an opioid free, non-surgical device that is not fully implantable meaning that it used for up to 60 days and designed to be intentionally removed after that short-term period," said Bennett.

Scientists have been testing and developing the device over the last seven years and believe SPRINT should be used for chronic pain management instead of prescription pain killers.

"It just again gives patients a safe alternative to treat their pain. there are so many patients now that either again are unfortunately on a prescription opioid use or just want to avoid opioids and are suffering with debilitating pain," said Bennett.

Centers for disease control and prevention show that opioids kill more than 33,000 people annually. In Ohio more than 4,000 people died from drug overdoses in 2016, a record 36 percent increase from the previous year.

Bennett believes the nation is in crisis mode and that this device could be a solution, not a last resort. She said the device is now available for use on the general market, some insurance companies will pay for it.

"This is a game changer for the field of pain management but specifically in Ohio, it just gave patients a safe alternative to treat their pain," she said.

The device can cost up to $5,000. Bennett encourages people to talk to their physicians about it.

You can read more about the device here.

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