A.J. Nye is Coming Home

A.J. Nye, transplant patient, had the main IV line removed from his chest. The gauze shows where the line used to be. Photo courtesy: Allison Irons.
A.J. Nye, transplant patient, had the main IV line removed from his chest. The gauze shows where the line used to be. Photo courtesy: Allison Irons.
A.J. admires a greeting card and photo from Ohio Governor Bob Taft. Photo courtesy: Allison Irons.
A.J. admires a greeting card and photo from Ohio Governor Bob Taft. Photo courtesy: Allison Irons.
A.J. in front of a quilt at the University of Nebraska. Photo courtesy: Allison Irons.
A.J. in front of a quilt at the University of Nebraska. Photo courtesy: Allison Irons.
A.J. with his Easter baskets. Photo courtesy: Allison Irons.
A.J. with his Easter baskets. Photo courtesy: Allison Irons.
A.J. colors Easter eggs. Photo courtesy: Allison Irons.
A.J. colors Easter eggs. Photo courtesy: Allison Irons.

OMAHA, NEBRASKA -- Just 2 1/2 months after surgery to replace is liver and small bowel, 10-year-old A.J. Nye is coming home to Toledo from the hospital. His mother delivered that news in an e-mail.

"Hello Everyone, We have such Joyful, Happy, Exciting, Enormous, Blessed NEWS to share with everyone! A.J. is heading home on Saturday April 2nd, 2005! Yeah!! THANK YOU LORD! AND THANK YOU ALL!!"

A.J. has been in and out of the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska, since December. The surgery itself happened the second week of January. "He's off the ventilator and breathing on his own and able to talk to us and tell us how he's feeling, so it's a great blessing," said A.J.'s mother, Allison Irons at the time of the transplant.

The liver and small bowel transplant that A.J. received will help him wave goodbye to a life of health problems. "It's called gastroscisis, where the intestines are formed outside of the body. And then as soon as he was born they had to put them back in," said Allison.

Back in January, Allison said she was grateful to the people who work at the hospital. "We've just loved everybody here," she said back in January. "They've just saved his life so many times."

Allison also expressed her gratitude to the people of northwest Ohio and Michigan. "They helped us raise $100,000 in four months for the first transplant.and that carried us through these eight years of those transplant expenses," said Allison.

A.J.'s grandparents told News 11 back in January that he's hoping he can enjoy life's little pleasures again. "He's looking forward to being able to swim again, to eat again. He wants to eat his macaroni and cheese, his mom's tuna salad," said Rita Nye, A.J.'s grandmother.

Count on News 11 for complete coverage of A.J.'s happy homecoming on Saturday.

Posted by AEB