Flood risk meeting gets heated in Findlay - Toledo News Now, News, Weather, Sports, Toledo, OH

Flood risk meeting gets heated in Findlay

Farmers in Findlay heard from the Army Corps of Engineers Tuesday about changes to their flood risk reduction study. Farmers in Findlay heard from the Army Corps of Engineers Tuesday about changes to their flood risk reduction study.
Some farmers, like Matt Hartman, would rather see the river cleaned. Some farmers, like Matt Hartman, would rather see the river cleaned.
Karl Jansen, with the Army Corps of Engineers says the new plan would come with a 31 percent residual risk. Karl Jansen, with the Army Corps of Engineers says the new plan would come with a 31 percent residual risk.
FINDLAY, OH (Toledo News Now) -

Farmers in Findlay heard from the Army Corps of Engineers Tuesday about changes to their flood risk reduction study.

The key change is the optimized sizing and operation of the planned diversion channel, which would result in the elimination of the cutoff levee between Blanchard River and Lye Creek.

But farmers, like Matt Hartman, want to see the river cleaned. His comments quickly heated the discussion.

"You look down that river to the west, and you tell me how water is supposed to flow when you got all that garbage in there,” said Hartman. “And I invite you, too, to look in there, Mr. Army Corps of Engineers, this is getting out of hand.”

Hartman added that if the city is going to spend $9,000,000 to study the river, it should be cleaned. He’s against the diversion channel and says log jams and sand bars in the Blanchard are the root of the problem.

"It’s just like your kitchen sink, if you plug it up, your sink is not going to drain,” said Hartman, while showing WTOL the area in question. “You don't take your kitchen sink and reroute it over to your bathroom to get it to drain, so why do that out here in nature. It works the same way.”

The recommended plan right now is a 9.3-mile diversion channel that takes flows from Eagle Creek and moves those flows downstream, west of Findlay.

“There would be 31 percent of what we call residual risk,” said Karl Janson with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. “With that 100-year event, where some properties would get damaged, they might not be as bad but still have some risk.”

As of Tuesday, it was too early to say when the diversion channel construction would begin. It is currently only considered a study.

The Corps plans to complete the study by Memorial Day 2016.

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