Google Doodle honors tactile blocks inventor

Does Monday’s Google Doodle look familiar? it’s because you’ve likely walked over it for years and never realized.

Google Doodle honors tactile blocks inventor

Author: Tegna | Published: 9:31 AM MST March 18, 2019 | Updated: 9:31 AM MST March 18, 2019

Monday's Google Doodle is celebrating the work of Japanese inventor Seiichi Miyake.

Miyake's tactile blocks, or "Tenji blocks" as they were originally called, are the raised bumps and bars on pavement that helps visually impaired or blind pedestrians move around safely.

The tactile blocks were first introduced near the Okayama School for the Blind in Okayama City, Japan on March 18, 1967.

Miyake came up with the idea as a way to help out a friend whose vision was becoming impaired.

The dotted blocks are typically found at crosswalk edges while the barred block versions provide directional clues, letting the visually impaired know they’re following a safe path.

His original design was installed in all Japan railway platforms in the 1970s and rapidly popped up in cities worldwide, according to CNET.com.

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